If you are into photographing Lost Places, the blogs of others who have explored before me are an invaluable source of information. The list of Lost Places for Berlin 15-20 years ago was incredibly long and fascinating. Sadly, many of the locations on such lists have since been gobbled up by real estate conglomerates for renovation or been fenced up and access denied completely. The abandoned train station of Siemensstadt has been on my list for a while and I have passed it a couple of times, always wondering how on earth to get in and onto the tracks.

Originally built in 1905, the primary purpose was to enable the Siemens employees to reach their place of work faster from the Hamburger Bahnhof (that station is now a museum of modern art and is located a few meters away from the Berlin Central Station), but the route somehow fell short for those commuting the northern locations. In 1927, the company then negotiated a new route with the Imperial Railroad Company and the tracks were built all the way to Siemensstadt. Like everything else in Berlin during WWII, the station took a heavy hit but was kept operational by the military for transporting supplies through alternative bridges. After the war, the tracks along the Siemensstadt line were handed over to the Soviets as part the war reparation package. Rebuilding and modernisation of the Berlin transport system between 1948 and 1995 led to countless changes and eventually its demise in 2005. Since then it has become a dignified historical landmark on the Lost Places and has fallen into complete disrepair. Recent reports dated November 2018 hint of new plans to renovate and reactivate the station as part of a greater project for Siemensstadt, but nothing is final.

Finding the abandoned station is no problem at all, but getting in is a different story. Like many other Lost Places, the site was fenced in and the original main gate is chained. It took a few tries until an, ahem, alternative entrance was located, just a matter of timing and how good you can pull off a casual “ho hum, am just looking around for my keys” look.

Good shoes are needed to negotiate the tiny slope up to the tracks and make sure you are not carrying too much with you. This is a location best shot in snow and fog, but since I was blessed with a blue sky and sunshine that day (and a fever), I can’t really complain. Besides, I doubt the “alternative entrance” is even visible in in the fog. Was it worth the effort? Absolutely! The mud stain on my pants is long gone.